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How To Control Your Husky Puppy’s Howling And Barking

By Danny Bainbridge / March 19, 2018
Husky Howling And Barking

Husky Puppy Howling & Barking

Having trouble keeping a lid on your noisy Husky? Your puppy won’t stop crying? Here are our top tips to controlling the situation and giving you (and your neighbors) some peace.

Try to figure out the cause

When your dog barks, howls, cries or whimpers he or she is trying to communicate. Your first job should be to try and figure out the cause so that you know what to fix.

Husky puppies barkingAlthough unlikely, your Husky might be injured or have a medical issue and crying out for help. That’s likely to result in whimpering at all times (not just at night) and whether you are around or not. If that’s the case you should of course get things checked out as soon as possible.

If, on the other hand, your Husky barks when you or other people are around, could this be a sign that they want something? Probably attention. Huskies are social dogs that settle better in packs. Left on their own they might get bored and exhibit destructive behaviors. This includes being left alone at night, so you might want to think about bringing the dog inside and closer to others (see Crate Training below).

Another possibility is that something has your Husky’s attention. A squirrel or possum running across the fence? A neighbor’s cat? If your Husky barks and continues to do so when you are present, see if he/she is pointing you to what they are barking at.

Issue a “Quiet” command

Just as you teach your dog other commands, a “quiet” command might work. This would be part of regular training of your puppy and require lots of feedback and patience. You want to issue the command and wait for your dog to quieten down before a reward such as a small treat, praise and pats. Regardless of the other methods on this page teaching your puppy a command to quieten down can not possibly be a bad thing, even if it doesn’t solve the problem this time.

More exerciseSiberian Husky getting walked for exercise

To try and tackle boredom, especially if you aren’t around during the day, you should consider giving your Siberian Husky more exercise. Exercise and training starts at an early age, and is required for the life of a Husky. Go for brisk walks or runs morning and night and see if this changes the barking behavior. If the barking subsides, then you have found the cause and can do something about it.

Introduce a companion

It might not always be possible but if you believe your Husky does suffer from separation anxiety, another canine companion (particularly another Husky) might be the answer. Huskies tend to get along and keep each other entertained. You can contact your local Husky rescue organization and see if any animals need a temporary home. This will let you test the theory before taking on board another pet full time. Just make sure they are all spaded and neutered if you are mixing the genders!

Best Howl & Bark Control Products For Huskies

As mentioned above there are several ways to stop husky puppy howling and barking. The first approach should always be using training methods and for that we recommend taking the time to learn more about barking in general so you can have an idea as to why a siberian husky is barking or howling. To do this in the chart below we recommend a book titled “Barking: The Sound of a Language (Dogwise Training Manual)” which specifically focuses on barking. This book will give you a much deeper understanding of how your Siberian Husky communicates and will help guide you in the direction needed to manage the issue.

Secondly you could try a device which uses an ultrasonic bark deterrent to keep your dogs howl under control.

And finally the third method which is closest to a shock collar is using a vibrating collar. A vibrating collar is a bit more humane than using an electric shock that your puppy won’t enjoy much.


Crate training

This is one of the most effective strategies at reducing howling and barking in any dogs, not just Huskies. You can place a crate (a box to enclose an animal) inside your home closer to you, but still keep your Husky contained so he doesn’t run amuck around the house. Go for a large metal framed crate, even if it seems to big for your puppy, because you will want to keep using this throughout the life of your Husky. Ensure the dog can get up, spin around and lay down again. A blanket can help soften the environment and add warmth. A water bottle attached to the side is handy.

Please remember that the crate is not punishment. It is not a jail! It is a device, when combined with positive feedback, can help improve the behavior of your dog.

We highly recommend reading this article on crate training for some more specific details, and also check out this YouTube video to see how it can be done.

Other ideas

Still struggling to control your Husky’s howling and barking?

  • You could try your local dog club, whether Huskies or general, and see what other people have tried.
  • You can add another toy such as a KONG to keep your puppy busy.
  • Finally, although somewhat controversial, you could try a “shock collar” for your dog. We don’t recommend this because it gives negative feedback, rather than positive, which isn’t a good way to encourage good behavior. As shown above, our preference to this if you choose to go this route would be a vibrating collar instead of the electric shock.


If your siberian husky puppy’s howling and barking is terrorising your family and neighbors, don’t despair! First check that your dog is healthy and not suffering from injury or illness. Work on teaching your dog to respond to a “quiet” command. Try more exercise or another companion and see if that helps. Crate training is also a great method to curbing antisocial behavior in dogs. You can also try devices such as the ultrasonic method, or vibrating collar. There are lots of options out there and although it might take time and patience, you will be rewarded with persistence in training and feedback.

About the author

Danny Bainbridge